Antoinette Young: Michigan Makeup Maven
Feb28

Antoinette Young: Michigan Makeup Maven

Antoinette Young is bold enough to spell color with a “K.” Her boldness and love of color gave her the courage and inspiration for her online business KueenofKolorKosmetics that’s been in operation since 2010. “I’m very colorful, I love color, there’s not a color I won’t wear,” Young, 25, said proudly. This Michigan native is a self-taught makeup artist, and has become a makeup guru over the years. Ironically, this “Lover of Color” was not always into makeup and put up quite a struggle when asked by her mom to wear it. During college, painting was the closest she got to experimenting with color. Post college, painting no longer excited her, but her artistic drive unknowingly remained inside her. She was asked to showcase her talents at a family event created by her cousin Aisha Lewis, a minister at Greater Southern Baptist Church. Taking her painting techniques from the canvas to the human face, Young decided to see if she had skills as a makeup artist. “From then on, that was it,” she said. “After that, I was so sick of buying expensive makeup, so I just decided ‘let me make stuff that I would like, but [it’s] less expensive.’” She went through the proper procedures of getting an LLC for her business, and her husband, Hanif Young was naturally on board and continues to be her main support and business partner. The couple created their first lip glaze together and named it “Blue Raz.” Young’s husband is currently responsible for creating the different lip glazes, and is familiar with all the company’s products. “I enjoy seeing the growth of the business, seeing her happy and seeing the customers happy,” said Hanif. “He’s my partner in everything, so it’s only natural we work together,” she said. After spending countless hours mixing, remixing, experimenting, pressing colors, and mixing more, Young was ready and eager to sell her products. However, business did not pick up like she intended. “I was so discouraged. I told Hanif ‘I don’t want to do this anymore.’” Still, she persevered. She used her downtime to keep mixing and making colors at the “lab” which was her mother in- law’s kitchen table. “The more dedication I put into it, the more responses I got from people…and now when a person gives me a try they always come back.” KueenofkolorKosmetics boasts of its great pigmentation and products that last all day. The cosmetic line produces 32 eye shadow colors, and 22 lip glazes. The business’ commitment to using hypoallergenic ingredients and making custom colors for clients is what sets it apart. At times, customers even has the opportunity to...

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Nashville music entrepreneur ventures into real estate development
Feb26

Nashville music entrepreneur ventures into real estate development

Entertainment entrepreneur and singer/songwriter Courtney “Coko” Eason is in the process of developing an entertainment center in Nashville, Tennessee that caters to Rock, Pop and urban music events. Eason, who is the founder of  Soundtrack Entertainment, LLC, which focuses on bringing a diverse selection of events, concerts and TV broadcasts to Nashville, wanted to create a venue that iscomparable to entertainment cities such as New York, Los Angeles and Atlanta.The development project, called nashUP is an 80,000 square foot state of the art entertainment district containing a cinema, bar, lounge, restaurant and live venue. In order to bring this vision to life, she enrolled in the REDI Foundation’s Online Certification Real Estate Development Course, which is the only private, mentoring certification real estate development course in the world. The 6-Month Real Estate Development Private Mentoring/Certification ONLINE Course provides over 700-pages (Four Separate Sections) of step-by-step, professionally printed instruction, assignments and exams coupled with unlimited private Mentoring from famed developer and educator, author and lecturer, Richard Michael Abraham in his final, legacy course. “The comprehensive printed Course materials that Richard Michael Abraham provides will turn anyone into an intuitive developer. His teachings have helped me to take my company to a whole new level,” said Eason. ” I plan to add Venue Development to my list of services and develop and own many entertainment facilities throughout the world. I’m thankful for being accepted into the REDI Foundation’s Course and I’m so proud to say that Mr. Abraham is my mentor.” Eason was selected the REDI Foundations’s Award of Distinction for her work on the project. According to REDI Foundation’s website, Eason “identified and fully researched the demand for her development venue, which costs $48,000,000. Eason’s Market Research/Analysis Study can be seen here. For course details, tuition costs, and to apply, visit www.redii.org For more information about Eason, click here. Courtesy of...

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G.U.R.L.S. Rock utilizes film “Beasts of the Southern Wild” to teach leadership skills to young girls
Feb20

G.U.R.L.S. Rock utilizes film “Beasts of the Southern Wild” to teach leadership skills to young girls

Dr. Raye Mitchell, the CEO of G.U.R.L.S. Rock, screened Beasts of the Southern Wild—the multi-Academy Award nominated film starring 9-year-old Quvenzhanė Wallis— to a sold-out audience in San Leandro, CA for the organization’s leadership training program for young girls. “It’s not just a great movie; it is a great educational training tool about the power of innovation, imagination, courage, diversity/inclusion, self-acceptance/positive images and commitment to excellence,” said Dr. Mitchell. Many educational institutions are fusing pop culture and leadership training methods together into their courses. Harvard Law School professor Charles Ogletree used the TV show The Wire for a course on justice and equality. This idea initially prompted the idea of the movie screening. “We are preparing future global leaders at the G.U.R.L.S. Rock Global Leadership Program, so it makes sense to use the same type of leadership training tools employed at leading educational institutions,” said Dr. Mitchell. “Beasts of the Southern Wild is an important tool to help youth and girls develop their leadership and life preparedness skills. Young actress Quvenzhanė Wallis is an important positive role model for girls of color.” The film seemed to gain credible recognition in no time. It went from being an independent film to a star at the Sundance Film Festival to gaining notoriety with several nominations at the upcoming 85th Annual Academy Awards. It has been nominated for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Actress—9-year-old Quvenzhanė Wallis, who in fact is the youngest actress ever nominated in that category. For young girls seeing another girl in a position at that age gives them the confidence, ambition and mind-frame that “I can do that too.” The story sends clear messages about real life experiences. It teaches girls how to deal with things including change, fear, self-esteem, loss and recovery and perseverance. “Every day we all have an opportunity to take steps that determine our destiny. This will illuminate some of those opportunities that our young future leaders have,” said Janice Edwards,  an Emmy nominated producer and panel member. This film helps to highlight the value in taking risks and that many times success will far outweigh the failures in life. It also helps to solidify positive aspects of girls of color while rejecting the negative stereotypes that have been projected throughout the media. The film also shows young girls, especially young girls of color that they can hold it together when faced with adversity because it is shown in the main character as she experiences loss, disappointment, and recovery. In Beasts of the Southern Wild there are differing ethnicities, but there is an authentic alliance that helps them work through the racial, gender and age-based divide...

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12 Tips to Help Women Reduce Debt
Feb19

12 Tips to Help Women Reduce Debt

As women, we don’t always shop as wisely as we should. Rather than shopping for bargains we tend to splurge on products that we know we don’t need or that will soon be out of style sending us into more debt than we are already in. The average woman in the United States is more than $10,000 in debt. What’s more is that it will take her more than 15 years to get out of it. Since this is tax season, tax refunds seem to be the main thing on people’s mind when filing their taxes. But, those refunds could also go towards paying off some debt. Here are some more helpful tips that can help women reduce and/or eliminate their debt completely: Ladies—stop borrowing money! If you can’t afford to buy the product with the cash you already have, then don’t buy it! It’s not worth scraping up change to pay those bills you skipped out on just for those pumps that were on sale. Remember your priorities. Control your spending habits. Resist the urge to Splurge! Unsubscribe from all shopping sites, catalogs and ignore all TV/radio commercials. Most of all… beware of window shopping. It’s all geared to compel you to buy! Make arrangements with your creditors and negotiate possible lower interest rates or lower settlement payments. For instance, if you owe $10,000, see if they will accept a one-time payment of $5,000 to settle the balance. It never hurts to reach out. Always pay more than the minimum amount due each month. Even $20 more makes a huge difference in paying off your debts. Find out if it is possible to transfer all your balances to your credit card with the lowest interest rate. It never hurts to ASK. Tackle your high interest credit cards or loans first. Make a realistic monthly budget—Factor in every dollar you spend. Track your expenses in a software program like Quicken or perhaps Excel. Categorize your expenses and report out how much you spent in each category so you can easily spot your problem areas. Praise yourself for every small accomplishment, even if you are paying off debt little by little. It always helps to speak with a credit counseling service. They can help you work out a reasonable plan. Be realistic. If you started accumulating debt three or four years ago, realize that it will take you more than that time to get out of debt. Be patient. Staying focused is the key! Focus on where you will be five, (10 or 15) years from now, because getting out of debt takes time. These tips are courtesy of www.DebtHelpForWomen.org....

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Celebrating African American Women Inventors
Feb18

Celebrating African American Women Inventors

When people think of great inventors, names like Thomas Edison, Leonardo Da Vinci, and Benjamin Franklin are usually the first names that come to mind. All these men are in fact remarkable inventors, but what about the women? Our history has been filled with great women inventors that don’t always get the recognition that is deserved. In honor of Black History Month, I wanted to acknowledge just a few of the great African American women inventors. Marjorie Joyner (1896 – 1994) Joyner was an African American businesswoman that lived in Monterey, Virginia. In 1912 she moved to the busy city of Chicago to study cosmetology at Molar Beauty School in Chicago. In 1916 she became the first African American to graduate from the school. Little did Joyner know that this would be the start to an invention that would help numerous women. Joyner began looking for a new way for African American women to be able to straighten their hair. One day she was inspired by a pot roast cooking with heat pins and invented a machine that would allow women of all colors to be able to either curl or straighten their hair. The machine is assembled with rods that you can wrap in your hair to straighten and/or curl. She received patent U.S. patent #1,693,515 on November 27,1928 for her design. Mary Beatrice Kenner (1912-2006) Kenner began coming up with inventions when she was just as little girl alongside her sister Mildred Davidson Austin Smith. She credited her father Sidney Nathaniel Davidson for her creative mind, saying that he was always encouraging her for her new ideas. Kenner was the inventor of an improved bathroom tissue holder that allowed the loose end of a bathroom tissue roll to be accessible at all times. She received patent #4,354,643, on October 19, 1982 for this device. Although Kenner had an astounding four other patents for various inventions, this was the machine that she would become most known for. Sarah E. Goode (1850-1905) Goode was the very first African American woman to receive a patent. Originally born into a life of slavery, she moved to Chicago when she was freed after the American Civil War. After she made the move to Chicago, Goode married Archibald Goode who worked as a carpenter. Goode opened a furniture store, which would later spark her widely known invention. After hearing numerous complaints from customers about not having enough space in their homes for the necessary furniture, she came up with a folding cabinet bed. When the bed was put in the folded position it looked like a desk that even had several compartments for storage. Today...

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Happy Valentines Day from ColorBlind!
Feb14

Happy Valentines Day from ColorBlind!

Today is the day when l.o.v.e, the most enduring word used to express affection towards one another is celebrated.. Poetic hallmark cards will be tossed around homes, offices, and schools, all sorts of sugary candy will be distributed to loved ones, and heart shaped objects will be exchanged all throughout the day and night. This day, in particular is special for ColorBlind because we are debuting our Winter 2013 issue, which focuses on love. Our cover story, titled “Beautiful Love” explores the relationship between best friends and fathers and daughters. There will always be stories about romantic love, and while that may be the case with Valentines Day, we wanted to show how love can be expressed in any form or fashion. Whether someone is a father, daughter, mother, sister, brother, or best friend, they all have one common bond that ties them together, and that is their affection for one another. So, if you plan on indulging in all the of Valentine’s Day celebration, don’t forget the true meaning of the holiday. It’s all about love. Be sure to check out our new issue...

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An icon never forgotten: Celebrating the life of Whitney Houston
Feb11

An icon never forgotten: Celebrating the life of Whitney Houston

Last year, around the same time as music stars were celebrating their achievements, the world was also mourning one of music’s greatest superstars, Ms. Whitney Houston. Houston died February 11 from an accidental drowning, just a day before the 2012 Grammys.  There have been a number of tributes taking place in honor of the musical icon, whose voice was truly one of a kind, and whose music touched millions of lives. Today, we honor the life and legacy of Houston,  a musical icon who may be gone, but never forgotten. Read more about Whitney tributes here. Check out a few timeless songs from Houston. I wanna dace with somebody http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eH3giaIzONA I will always love you http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3JWTaaS7LdU Greatest love of all...

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Celebrate Black History Month in the “D”
Feb08

Celebrate Black History Month in the “D”

Black History Month is significant for many reasons, mainly because it is the time when African American achievements are celebrated on a national scale and its culture is highlighted through various events. This month is particularly special for ColorBlind because this was the month when its founders thought of the idea to start this publication. We take great joy in being able to showcase the accomplishments and history of African Americans, especially women of color. We will be highlighting a number of Black History Month events on our site throughout February.We also want to make sure our readers take advantage of some of the many events that are taking place in the metro Detroit area.   Charles H. Wright Museum Feb 16– Meet the Scientist Saturday 1-2pm (313-494-5800) Inspiring Minds: African American in Science and Technology (Monday thru Saturday 9am-5pm) Chris Webber Collection: Exceptional People During Extraordinary Times, 1755 to Present (any day in February) Visions of our 44th President (any day in February)   The Henry Ford Museum African American Innovator Tours—Everyday in February at 10, 11, 1, 2 and 3 (All tours depart from the Museum Plaza) Drive-In Theatre for musical and dramatic performances honoring particular eras: Feb. 2 and 3– Pre-Emancipation—The North Star Gospel Chorate- 11:30, 1, & 2:30; “Ain’t I a Woman: Meet Sojourner Truth,”- 11:30, 12:30 & 1:30 Feb 9 and 10- Northern Migration; Robert Jones, 11:30, 1, 2:30; “Elijah: The Real McCoy,” 12:30, 1:30 & 3 Feb 16 and 17– Civil Rights Movement; “Minds on Freedom,” 11:30, 1, 2:30 Feb 23 and 24– Contemporary Times; The Hamilton Family, 11:30, 1, 2:30   PBS TV Programming Feb 5– 8-9pm–“Roots”- watch the actors talk about their experiences Feb 7– 9-10pm—LIFECASTERS- showcasing the determination and creativity of African Americans Feb 15– 10:30-11:30pm—Underground Railroad: The William Still Story Feb 18– 10-11pm—“The Powerbroker: Whitney Young’s Fight for Civil Rights” Feb 22– 9-10pm—“Sister Rosetta Tharpe: The Godmother of Rock & Roll” (She influenced musicians from Chuck Berry to Little Richard and even Elvis) Feb 22– 10-11:30pm—Slavery By Another Name Feb 26– 8-11pm—Women who make America (Barbara Smith, Diane Nash, and Eleanor Holmes Norton)   Detroit Historical Museum Doorway to Freedom: Detroit and the Underground Railroad at the Detroit Historical Museum (313-833-1805)   DIA February 8 – Friday Night Live- Music: Black Women Rock! (BHM): 7 & 8:30 p.m. February 10 – Lecture: Twenty-First Annual Alain Locke Awards: Speak of Me as I Am: 2 p.m.  February 15 – Friday Night Live  – Music: Jade Simmons: 7 & 8:30 p.m. February 16 – Detroit Film Theatre: Special Event: The Meaning of Hope: 2 p.m.  February 17 – Sunday Music Bar: Jade Simmons: 1 p.m....

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Do parents still have “the talk” with their kids?
Feb06

Do parents still have “the talk” with their kids?

Growing up, my parents never had an official sex talk with me. What my mom said was very short and straightforward, “Don’t have sex until marriage.” I had so many questions, but my mom seemed uncomfortable whenever the topic was brought up. My older cousin, Tiffany had a slumber party and invited all the teen girls in our family.  There she gave us an in depth sex talk and we all  felt more knowledgeable about the topic afterward. With the advent of the Internet, it has become a lot easier for adolescents to learn about sex other than from their parents. They are able to search any topic, receive any information and see any type of content. So the question remains, do parents talk to their kids about sex anymore? Ashley Henderson, 14, a ninth grader at Regina High School in Warren, Michigan has had “the talk” with her parents. Henderson says she doesn’t feel pressured about having sex earlier than she’s ready to. Her parents have advised her to “wait until marriage to have sex.” “Even if I don’t wait until marriage they want me to always use protection and come to them before it happens,” said Henderson during a phone interview. Many parents have the sex talk with their kids because they feel it’s an important topic. Kassia Mason is a single parent with two kids: Demeitric Jr., 13 and Amyrah, 8. She’s already started talking to her son about it. She asks if he’s sexually active and takes it from there. “I talk to him about condoms and if he knows how to use them, but he says he’s not interested in that as of yet,” said Mason.  She plans to take him to the doctor for a demonstration. Mason believes it’s important to talk to kids about sex because it’s a more personalized situation and it’s a space where parents can be truthful. She plans to talk to her daughter about the topic when she’s 10 although that talk will be different. She plans to start it off by telling her how she came into the world and build slowly from there. Parents shouldn’t fear the sex talk with their kids because if there’s anyone that should give them that advice, it should be the people that care about them and that are experienced in that area. According to a nationally representative survey from USA Today,  42 percent of parents say they’ve talked to their teens “many times” about how to say no to sex, whereas only 27 percent of teens say parents have talked to them that often.” If parents engaged in the sex talk more often, then more kids...

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Iron Sharpens Iron: Impact of Female Leadership
Feb06

Iron Sharpens Iron: Impact of Female Leadership

A woman’s leadership skills have great impact even when it goes unseen and unrecognized.  She may be a leader in the forefront, in the background or even navigate the murky waters in between. Dr. Melissa Harris-Perry, a scholar and MSNBC, host gave the keynote address for the Martin Luther King Jr. week of events at Purdue University and challenged us to remember Dr. King, the man who was imperfect, had to a make decisions that would “make some cringe” and needed the support and challenge from strong women. She challenged the design of Dr. King’s national memorial, reminding us of the reality that “King emerged from a movement, not a rock.” With the support and challenge of people like Coretta Scott King, Rosa Parks and Ella Baker, he was able to accomplish his mission, which impacts the country and the world to this day. In the same way that we honor Dr. King, we must also recognize and respect the work of his female collaborators. Dr. Harris-Perry reminded us that, “We must remember that Dr. King had collaborators and challengers, often women, who pushed him to be one of the most effective activists of our time.” So what does that mean for us women today? In a society where media, past failed relationships and bad experiences encourage rifts in our relationships with Black men, I left the event thinking about how men and women need each other to make a lasting impact in our society, one which will benefit generations to come. There are times when as women we are uniquely positioned and skilled to lead at the forefront of a movement such as with many of the immigration rights groups. But, I believe there will be a time when we must stand by the side of our male counterparts as both supporters and challengers in order to birth the dream. They must do the same for us. After all, the Bible says, “Iron sharpeneth iron; so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend.” Whether a woman leads in the forefront, supports in the background or navigates the waters in between, her leadership will have long lasting impact. After all, there would be no President Barack Obama without Michelle and vice versa. They need each other and so do we. Women, go LEAD, you are needed, your work will have impact! By Delean Tolbert –...

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