Women’s History Month: Women Making Strides in S.T.E.M. Fields
Mar25

Women’s History Month: Women Making Strides in S.T.E.M. Fields

Since March is National Women’s History Month, it is only right that we pay homage to women that have worked hard in fields that have been male-dominated for so long: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). The National Women’s History Project, which has been around since 1980, has thrived on the notion of celebrating women’s accomplishments in the STEM field. NWHP’s efforts have become more refined over the years and each year they develop a theme for Women’s History Month. This year’s theme is Women Inspiring Innovation through Imagination. This project is dedicated to women who have had the courage, skill, intelligence and drive to shoot for the stars and make their dreams come true. They have a list of honorees and nominees such as Patricia Bath, a native of Harlem who became an ophthalmologist and advocate for healthy vision. Bath’s love for science started with her parents, who were both hard working individuals. Her father was a Merchant Marine that occasionally wrote a column in a local newspaper and her mother was a housekeeper. When her mother purchased a chemistry for a young Bath, her interest in science bloomed. At the tender age of 16, Bath participated in a cancer research workshop  sponsored by the National Science Foundation.  Dr. Robert Bernard was so impressed with her work that he incorporated her data into a scientific paper that he presented at a conference. Bath received rave reviews for her research and was rewarded with a Merit Award from Mademoiselle Magazine in 1960. In 1973, she became the first African American to complete a residency in ophthalmology. After completing her residency, she became the first faculty member at UCLA’s Jules Stein Eye Institute in the Department of Ophthalmology. She attended several colleges and attained degrees that helped her become e a well-known scientist. While she was at Columbia University, she learned that African Americans were more likely to suffer from blindness than other patients due to glaucoma. Those findings prompted her to jump-start a program geared toward economically challenged neighborhoods. She started Community Ophthalmology—a program that brought tools to communities where people were at a disadvantage for adequate eye care. In 1986, she invented the Laserphace Probe, which is used to drastically improve the sight of cataract patients. She patented the device in 1988 becoming the first African American female doctor to receive a medical patent. Her machine provided a more effective and less painful way to treat patients. With her invention, she successfully went on to treat and restore the sight of patients who had been blind for more than 30 years. Bath is an educator, inventor, doctor and...

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Tips To Prepare For An Interview
Mar18

Tips To Prepare For An Interview

Whether the interview is for a part-time job, to pay your way through school or for the career you have always dreamed of, you must prepare to be successful. Here is a list of tips to help prepare yourself for any interview. Research the company: Nothing is a bigger deal breaker for an interview then to not have prior knowledge about the company you’re applying for. Research the company to know what it is exactly the company does and their main business goal. Even knowing a some of the company’s history can make you stand out from the rest of the candidates. The more you know about the company, the better. Pre-Interview with a friend: First, make a list of the questions you think they may ask you during the interview. After you have made that list, give it to a friend and have a faux-interview(s). This will make you feel more at ease with your answers during the actual interview and you can work on getting that perfect answer. Make a list of skills: Before your interview, sit down and make a list of all your qualifying skills for that job placement. This will not only help you during your interview when asked about your skills, but this will also give you a little confidence boost to see your skills and qualifications written down on paper. Remember what to bring: Sit down and think of anything necessary to bring along to the interview. As you think of things to bring, set them aside so they are ready to go with you to the interview. This could be anything from a notepad of paper to extra copies of your resume. Pick out an outfit: The first thing your interviewer is going to notice when you come to an interview is you. Make sure that you have a clean, ironed, and professional outfit ready for your interview. Dress to impress and nothing less. Know where it is: This may seem obvious, but you would be surprised how many people are late for interviews just because they get lost on the way. It’s a good idea to drive to the location of the interview the night before and time yourself. This way you’ll know exactly how long it takes and if there is anything to look out for, such as road closings and construction. Follow up: It’s always good to follow up after an interview. Let me make this clear though: DON’T PRESSURE THEM FOR AN ANSWER. Simply call, e-mail, or even hand write a letter thanking them for the opportunity and that you hope to hear from them soon. Not only does...

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Congress revitalizes Violence Against Women Act
Mar11

Congress revitalizes Violence Against Women Act

In 1994, President Bill Clinton signed into law the Violence Against Women Act,  which provides $1.6 billion toward the investigation and prosecution of violent crimes against women, imposes automatic and mandatory restitution on those convicted, and allows civil redress in cases prosecutors chose to leave unprosecuted. The act set the standard for how to protect women, and some men, from domestic abuse and prosecute abusers and is credited with helping reduce domestic violence incidents by two-thirds since its inception. On Thursday, March 7,  President Barack Obama signed a law expanding protections for victims of domestic violence, renewing a measure credited with curbing violence against women, according to the Associated Press. As a result of the act, the  rate of sexual violence against women and girls age 12 or older fell 64 percent in a decade and has remained stable for five years, the Justice Department said in a survey released Thursday. In 2010, women and girls nationwide experienced about 270,000 rapes or sexual assaults, compared with 556,000 in 1995. The survey also showed that the rate of rapes and sexual assaults involving women has plateaued while violent crime overall has declined. Women’s advocacy groups called the report proof that the Violence Against Women Act and heightened awareness of the problem by police has had a positive effect. To read more about the revitalized act, click here. Information courtesy of Associated...

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Dreaming Up Her Work: author Cassandra George Sturges’ road to artistic success
Mar08

Dreaming Up Her Work: author Cassandra George Sturges’ road to artistic success

As a troubled teen from Detroit, Cassandra George Sturges had not envisioned much for her future. School never interested her and she rendered it useless. Once she entered high school her time was spent less on academics and more on ditching, drinking and hanging with the wrong crowd. Never accumulating more than ninth grade credits she eventually left school. At that point the only thing she had going for her was a part-time job at Little Caesars. There, she would have a conversation that would change her outlook on life. As Sturges worked alongside her 57-year-old co-worker Frank, they busied themselves and engaged in general conversation. Through that conversation she received a wake-up call. “I did not want to be 57-years-old working at Little Caesars making $3.35 for the rest of my life,” she said. Immediately she returned to school and received her GED. With the encouragement of the GED counselor she enrolled in Henry Ford Community College. After receiving her associates degree, she attended the University of Michigan-Dearborn. From that day forward she never ceased to advance her education. “At some point school saved my life,” Sturges said. “Some people need drugs, [but] school became my drug.” She also used school as a mechanism to overcome many psychological issues she dealt with at the time. She is now a psychologist and has been a teacher at Washtenaw Community College for 10 years. “I love my job. I love my colleagues. I love my students,” she said. “Every morning when I wake up I feel super lucky and super blessed.” After taking on an online course at Wastenaw Community College, Sturges had more free time and began to craft her latest artistic business venture: a doll line. She created her doll line by hand, and they are made of fabric and are anatomically correct. Once she began creating the dolls she started having crazy dreams. She had dreams that there were seven sisters flying around on the cape of a man. One morning, she was awakened by her dream. She kept hearing, “Daddy, daddy, daddy, we want the pretty blue ball.” It was then that she sat up and wrote the entire outline from her dream. “I’ve chased everything, my degrees. I’ve chased my jobs. That’s the only thing that came to me.” From that dream, Sturges decided to write a science fiction novel titled Jungle Beauty Goddess’s Pretty Blue Ball. Sturges was never interested in science fiction other than Star Trek as a kid so her novel required a lot of research. The book is about seven black women who are sisters and superheroes. For their collective birthday...

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Celebrating Women’s History Month
Mar01

Celebrating Women’s History Month

Woman must not accept; she must challenge. She must not be awed by that which has been built up around her; she must reverence that woman in her which struggles for expression. ~ Margaret Sanger ~ The above quote by female activist Margaret Sanger could not be more true, as it represents women’s role in society and her ability to rise above her circumstances. Women hold an incredible amount of power, and that power is continuing to expand within the professional realm. Their  influence now extends to the highest office in the U.S., via First Lady Michelle Obama, who serves as an excellent example of female empowerment. Mrs. Obama has worked tirelessly to increase community service,  provide better opportunities for army veterans and improve youth development. Women are continuing to make moves in every career field possible, and their role in society is continuing to be elevated. Most recently, a historical decision was made by Congress that they were lifting the ban on women serving in combat positions. That is one of many examples of how women are showcasing their equality with men. They are continuing to make extraordinary moves and this month we pay tribute to them. Today begins the month long celebration of Women History Month, which began in 1987. According to the US. Census Bureau, National Women’s History Month’s roots go back to March 8, 1857, when women from New York City factories staged a protest over working conditions. In 1981, Congress established Women’s History Week, and in 1987, WHM was expanded to a month. In ColorBlind’s Winter issue, we dedicated a special section to Women’s History Month. Be sure to check out our exclusive interview with Michelle Duster, the great-granddaughter of the pioneering journalist and activist Ida B. Wells. We also pay tribute to activist  Sojourner Truth and feminist Anna Julia Cooper. Throughout the month of March, the national spotlight will be on women, but lets not forget that the efforts of females should be celebrated everyday, not just during March. Click here to read more facts about Women’s History Month.   Sources http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/cb13-ff04.html Photo courtesy...

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