BET & TV One Announce New Fall Internships
Sep27

BET & TV One Announce New Fall Internships

  Students can now apply for paid internship opportunities at two of the leading African American cable networks.    BET and TV One, the two largest Black-focused cable television channels, are looking for interns for the Fall 2013 season. Internships are available in career categories including media, communications, graphic design, marketing, public relations, and more. The BET Networks Internship program provides paid internships for both undergraduate and graduate college students at five different BETN locations. They are open to both undergraduate and graduate students interested in working in the media industry. The internships will help students visualize what their careers will be like through actual work experience. During the Spring, Summer and Fall, students will find internships that match their skills and career interests. Each internship lasts about 10 weeks. The TV One Internship Program offers internships to undergraduate college students in the Fall, Spring and Summer. The internships are for students interested in a career in the media industry. Internships provide real, practical work experience for students in the fields in which they are studying. Whether it’s marketing and sales, finance, legal, human resources, digital media, production or programming, students will find an internship opportunity that will enrich their learning and give them insight into their career options. For more details about the BET Internship program, visit: www.findinternships.com/2013/09/bet-networks-internships.html For more details about the TV One Internship program, visit: www.findinternships.com/2013/09/tv-one-internship-program To search hundreds of other 2013-14 internships, visit: www.FindInternships.com Press Release Courtesy of BlackNews.com and BlackPR.com...

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10-year-old Girl Becomes Detroit’s Youngest Entrepreneur
Sep17

10-year-old Girl Becomes Detroit’s Youngest Entrepreneur

Detroit – Local 4 reports regularly on new businesses opening up in Detroit, and when young entrepreneurs bring their talents to try to help revitalize and re-build our city. But, we’ve rarely reported on a business woman quite this young. “I wanna let everyone know that I am Detroit’s youngest entrepreneur and I like to do what I like to do,” said the 10-year-old Asia. Asia Newson is a little dynamo that’s even captured Dan Gilbert’s attention. Newson sells candles with her dad. Her big smile is matched by her passion to get other kids involved. “I teach young people, like myself, how to make their own money,” she said. Newson’s business is called Super-Business Girl. The 10-year-old was made to manage, and she runs a super-tight ship. “Some of my trainees are older than me, but I’m ten, this is my company and I’m the boss of the company so you have to listen to me, and if you don’t then I don’t know what to tell you,” said Newson. But, she knew what to tell Dan Gilbert when they bumped into each other. “I see this big camera crew across the street while Asia was talking to one of her customers, and they approached her and it happened to be Dan Gilbert,” said Asia’s father Michael Newson. During her chance encounter with the Detroit business leader, Asia scheduled a follow-up meeting to discuss her future plans. “I would like to have a store front in his building and the Compuware Building. That’s my main goal,” she said. “She inspires me. She’s kind, she’s outspoken and she’s intelligent,” said Asia’s mother. A Detroit start-up, Bamboo Detroit, began advising Asia and her family nearly three months ago. “I think that she will become one of the most successful young persons that America has in all honesty,” said Brian Davis co-founder of Bamboo Detroit. “She already has it right. She already knows about customers, she knows how to structure a business. It’s incredible,” said Bamboo co-founder Mike Ferlito. With more young people like Asia and the support systems behind them, it looks like Detroit’s future is very bright. Press Release Courtesy of...

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Obama’s Words On Syria
Sep11

Obama’s Words On Syria

East Room THE PRESIDENT:  My fellow Americans, tonight I want to talk to you about Syria — why it matters, and where we go from here. Over the past two years, what began as a series of peaceful protests against the repressive regime of Bashar al-Assad has turned into a brutal civil war.  Over 100,000 people have been killed.  Millions have fled the country.  In that time, America has worked with allies to provide humanitarian support, to help the moderate opposition, and to shape a political settlement.  But I have resisted calls for military action, because we cannot resolve someone else’s civil war through force, particularly after a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan. The situation profoundly changed, though, on August 21st, when Assad’s government gassed to death over a thousand people, including hundreds of children.  The images from this massacre are sickening:  Men, women, children lying in rows, killed by poison gas.  Others foaming at the mouth, gasping for breath.  A father clutching his dead children, imploring them to get up and walk.  On that terrible night, the world saw in gruesome detail the terrible nature of chemical weapons, and why the overwhelming majority of humanity has declared them off-limits — a crime against humanity, and a violation of the laws of war. This was not always the case.  In World War I, American GIs were among the many thousands killed by deadly gas in the trenches of Europe.  In World War II, the Nazis used gas to inflict the horror of the Holocaust.  Because these weapons can kill on a mass scale, with no distinction between soldier and infant, the civilized world has spent a century working to ban them.  And in 1997, the United States Senate overwhelmingly approved an international agreement prohibiting the use of chemical weapons, now joined by 189 governments that represent 98 percent of humanity. On August 21st, these basic rules were violated, along with our sense of common humanity.  No one disputes that chemical weapons were used in Syria.  The world saw thousands of videos, cell phone pictures, and social media accounts from the attack, and humanitarian organizations told stories of hospitals packed with people who had symptoms of poison gas. Moreover, we know the Assad regime was responsible.  In the days leading up to August 21st, we know that Assad’s chemical weapons personnel prepared for an attack near an area where they mix sarin gas.  They distributed gasmasks to their troops.  Then they fired rockets from a regime-controlled area into 11 neighborhoods that the regime has been trying to wipe clear of opposition forces.  Shortly after those rockets landed, the...

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US Swimmer Diana Nyad Makes Historic Cuba-Florida Crossing
Sep02

US Swimmer Diana Nyad Makes Historic Cuba-Florida Crossing

Key West, Florida (CNN) — This time, neither storm nor jellyfish, nausea nor utter fatigue could keep 64-year-old endurance swimmer Diana Nyad from achieving her lifelong ambition of conquering the Straits of Florida. On Monday, Nyad became the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without a protective cage, willing her way to a Key West beach just before 2 p.m. ET, nearly 53 hours after jumping into the ocean in Havana for her fifth try in 35 years. Nyad pumped her fist as she walked onto the beach toward an awaiting medic before being guided to an ambulance. Dozens of onlookers — some in kayaks and boats, many others wading in the water or standing on shore — gathered to cheer her on as she finished the more-than-100-mile swim It was a long-awaited triumph for Nyad, who was making her fifth attempt since 1978 and her fourth since turning 60. The first four tries were marked by gut-wrenching setbacks; if the rough, strength-sapping seas didn’t force her to quit, an hours-long asthma attack or paralyzing and excruciating jellyfish stings did. But for this swim, besides donning a suit meant to protect her against her jellyfish nemesis, she wore a special mask to prevent jellyfish stings to her tongue, a key factor in her failed attempt last year. She and her support team didn’t encounter many jellyfish this time. But she had plenty of other challenges, and with roughly 2.5 miles left to go, she paused in the water to thank her crew. “This is a lifelong dream of mine, and I’m very, very glad to be with you,” she said late Monday morning, treading water as she spoke to her team on the five boats gathered around her, according to the team’s website. “You pulled through; you are pros and have a great heart. So let’s get going so we can have a whopping party,” she said, according to the website. Nyad’s age was one of the intriguing aspects of her latest attempts. Nyad, who was 29 when she first tried, said last week that she wanted to show that “you can dream at any age.” “This time, I am 64. So, the years of my life are shorter to the end,” she said at a news conference in Havana on Friday. “So this time I am, all the way across … going to think about all those life lessons that came up during the swim.” Fatigue almost seemed poised to derail her again early Monday. About 7:30 a.m. ET, she was slurring her speech because of a swollen tongue and lips, her support team reported on its...

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