Green Thumb Guide: Gardening Apps
Jun30

Green Thumb Guide: Gardening Apps

Gardening season is upon us, and whether you have a green thumb or not, ColorBlind Magazine has you covered. Check out the 4 gardening apps below for gardening tips and tricks!   1. Food Gardening Guide<https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ogden.foodgardeningguide> (iOS) – If you’re interested in venturing into organic food gardening, this free app from MOTHER EARTH NEWS magazine provides expert gardening techniques, information on top crops, and access to the magazine’s blog feeds covering “Do It Yourself” projects, natural health, green homes and more.   2. Garden Insects Guide<https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/garden-insects-guide/id779439555?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D4>(iOS) – Not all insects are bad for your garden, but you don’t want to let the ones that are bug your plants to death!  This free guide from the editors of MOTHER EARTH NEWS magazine will help you identify the bad bugs from the good bugs. It provides advice on how you can prevent damage from the pest insects and attract the beneficial ones. The app has a “Pest Control” section that tells you how to get rid of insect pests organically and naturally. 3.GardenSquared<https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.dek.gardensquared>(Android) – This app assists in planning and tracking square foot gardens—ranging from 1’ by 1’ to 4’ by 8’—and even patio containers, seedlings and raised garden beds. Details of every plot can be saved along with a journal entry/task tracker. Great for beginners!   4. Garden Manager: Plant Alarm<https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.jee.green>(Android) – This app reminds you exactly when to water, fertilize, spray pesticide and more. Custom tasks are also available so you will be reminded to tend to specific plants. You can take a photo log of how your plants grow, and then brag about your success on social media! Information supplied by Teresa Mask of AT&T Media...

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Freedom and Juneteenth
Jun19

Freedom and Juneteenth

Written by: Leah T. Johnson and originally appearing on her personal blog, Leah Figures it Out  I have no excuses. I forgot that today is a historical day. Today is Juneteenth. Yeah, Juneteenth. The “Fourth of July” for African Americans, the day in 1865 when slavery ended in the United States, the day when the word “Freedom” yearned to be defined, and was a blessing and curse to many. This understanding of freedom is explored in Leonard Pitts’ novel, Freeman which I have been practically engrossed in this month. His discussion and portrayal of how freed slaves and their masters must have felt immediately after it was announced that the war had ended and slavery was no more, has never, in my opinion, been written so eloquently in a novel. Tilda, a former female slave, refuses to leave her master’s plantation although she is free. She learned of the decision of two former slaves who decided that to them, freedom meant to run as far away as possible from the plantation. This led to Tilda witnessing their death by their former master, who refused to allow his former slaves enjoy their newfound freedom. To the master, those former slaves would have to enjoy their freedom in death. Some slave owners in the novel decided to take their own lives, preferring to die rather than see a world in which the negro now was free and gaining civil rights. Their suicidal decision echoes that of slave mothers who, prior to the end of slavery, chose to kill their newborn child to protect them from even the notion of harsh slavery, let alone to live as a slave. Everyone in the novel, black, white, male, female, slave or slave owner, was grappling with the definition of freedom. It is for this reason only, that I can even somewhat excuse myself for forgetting the importance of this day. I became so interested in the lives of these fictional characters, that I forgot today was the day the emotions of Freeman novel characters were reality for many in the United States. On this day, many asked themselves: ‘I am free, but what does that mean? Where do I go? What do I do?’ or ‘My slaves are free? What has happened? What is this world coming to? Can I really accept this as true?’ Freedom. A word with varying definitions. And on this day, this one word changed a people, and a country. For more information on Juneteenth...

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Advice of ColorBlind Daddys
Jun15

Advice of ColorBlind Daddys

The ladies of ColorBlind Magazine and our readers recognize the important role that our fathers have played and continue to play in our lives. The following are comments received when asked what’s the best advice our fathers gave us. Enjoy!! “My dad is the most laid back person I know. I’ve adopted a lot of his qualities and just in watching how he handles situations, I have learned to stay calm in tough situations and always try to look at the positive side of things. That’s one of the most important lessons I’ve learned from my dad.” — Veronica Grandison, ColorBlind Magazine Co-Founder and Editorial Director   “My Dad always told me that education is the key to unlocking the truths of the world. I always thought it had to do with school, but in fact, it was about learning everything you can about the world around you so you can be the change the world needs. I suppose this is why I became an educator… My daddy was Felmon L. Redmon, Jr. — Jerrice Donnelson, ColorBlind Magazine Reader  “My dad said ‘Always do what you love. Life is too short to be doing something that makes you miserable just because it brings money in. You can’t put a price on passion.'” — Jade Gonzalez, ColorBlind Magazine Web Editor and Interim Editorial Director   “My dad always says ‘It’s not the mistake you make, it’s all in how you recover.’ He also has shown me that patience is SUCH an important quality. He is easily the most patient person I know.” — Leah T. Johnson, ColorBlind Magazine CEO and Co-Founder  “My dad told me ‘ask for what you want. The worse anyone can tell you is no. The best anyone can tell you is yes.'” — Rikki Mac, ColorBlind Magazine Reader  “My dad has always pushed me to soar higher with every new opportunity and I love him for that!” — Jessica Wilson, ColorBlind Magazine Contributing...

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Ruby Dee: An Icon
Jun13

Ruby Dee: An Icon

By: Jalissa Williams/ColorBlind Magazine Editorial Intern  Ruby Dee the poet, activist, journalist, playwright, screenwriter and actress passed Wednesday June 11th at the age of 91 from natural causes. She was born as Ruby Ann Wallace in Cleveland, Ohio but raised in Harlem New York where she graduated from high school and continued her education at Hunter College. After her college graduation Dee pursed a career in performing arts. She joined the American Negro Theater working under prolific actors Sidney Poitier, Hilda Simms and Harry Belafonte. Her career blossomed and she became the first African American woman to portray a leading role in the famed Shakespeare Festival. In 1961 she starred in the film A Raisin in the Sun earning rave reviews and numerous nominations for her legendary performance. This film was later selected to be preserved by the United States of National Film Registry as being aesthetically significant. As Dee’s career continued, she married Ossie Davis, a legend in his own right. The two would remain a couple until his death in 2005. Dee continued acting and starred in the 2007 hit American Gangster. Her efforts produced a nomination from the Academy for Best Supporting Actress for her portrayal of the matriarch of the crime family. Ruby Dee was not just known for acting. She was a revolutionist and a strong advocate for equality. Dee helped pave the way for African Americans to have equal rights in society. Her life and legacy will be remembered because she broke racial barriers to make the world better. Check back to colorblindmagazine.com for Ruby Dee’s memorial...

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