You gotta have Friends!
Jul18

You gotta have Friends!

This opinion piece was written by Antonia “Toni” Crews as part of July being “Teen Talk” Month here at ColorBlind Magazine.  Making Friends  The best way to make friends is to just be your self and not pretend to be something you’re not. [Pretending to be someone you’re not] Not only does that lead to trouble but it leads to false friendships. If you be your self there is always someone else out there like you or  [someone who] can relate to you. You can become friends with someone off of common interests that you both have. You should also be nice to people. If you are always mean then you probably will not end up with friends. From my experience, just being my self has gotten me tons of good friends that I hold dear to this day. Also, make the effort; meaning, go up and talk to people first. By doing that, you learn more about that person and by that time, you’ve made a new friend.   When trying to make friends do NOT judge anyone. Like the saying “Never judge a book by its cover” people are the same way. A person could look really mean but might turn out to be the nicest, goofiest person ever! But, you wouldn’t know that if you judge them. That’s where taking the initiative to talk to them first comes in. So remember: Be yourself, be nice, take the initiative, and DO NOT judge. By doing this, you should have plenty of good friends. Antonia Crews, 16,  participated in the 2013 summer writing program at he University of Michigan-Dearborn and was one of Leah T. Johnson’s students. This summer, Toni is away at Harvard for a summer program. In her spare time she likes reading, sports, “netflixing”, and music. “I’m still at that age where I’m still learning,” she said. “To me, learning new things is the best thing about being a teen.”...

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Bullying- Be Gone!
Jul16

Bullying- Be Gone!

The following is an opinion piece written by Antonia “Toni” Crews as part of July being “Teen Talk Month” Bullying  No one likes a bully and no one should be one, but sadly we do have them. It is very hard to deal with bullies, but with the help of friends, family, and teachers, you can receive comfort. First, a person should NOT care what other people think of them or what they say. Verbal bullying is easier to deal with than cyber bullying and physical bullying. In verbal bullying you can ignore the person and don’t pay attention to anything they are saying because 9 times out of 10 its not true. If ignoring the bully doesn’t work then tell someone like a close friend, parent, teacher and try to get the issue resolved. You should not be afraid to talk to an adult about being bullied, since they can help you. Another type of bullying you might encounter is cyber bullying which is very harsh. When this happens you should report the person, block the person [or delete them] on social media pages and tell an adult immediately before that person can post anything else about you. Cyber Bullying is very serious because it is on the internet and once its posted it will forever be there. Another serious form of bullying is a physical bully. If that person is touching you, (ie hitting) you need to go tell an adult and get help so it can stop. You can get seriously hurt and it is very dangerous regardless what the bully might think.When it comes to bullying there is no such thing as a “tattle tale” or a “snitch” you must tell an adult so that person or yourself can get help. In our day, too many children commit suicide because they were or are being bullied. This has to stop we must take a stand to stop bullies and to help those who are getting bullied. Antonia Crews, 16,  participated in the 2013 summer writing program at the University of Michigan-Dearborn and was one of Leah T. Johnson’s students. This summer, Toni is away at Harvard for a summer program. In her spare time she likes reading, sports, “netflixing”, and music. “I’m still at that age where I’m still learning,” she said. “To me, learning new things is the best thing about being a...

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Hats off to MCAS
Jul14

Hats off to MCAS

This past weekend, Harvette Williams, Founder of Michigan Coalition of Anti-Stalking (MCAS) held a Tea Party to raise awareness for her non profit and for stalking. The event was held at the Lakes of Taylor Golf Course and was marketed as a “Tee-N-Tea” with the men playing a round a golf in the morning, and the ladies’ pretty hat tea party in the afternoon.  Williams shared a few thoughts with ColorBlind Magazine on her non-profit and future goals.  Read below and visit awareness1.com for more information on MCAS.   ColorBlind Magazine: Give us a recap of your first fundraiser ever and the turnout. Harvette Williams: My first fundraiser was at  Mario’s in 2007. Nobody came although it was free. It was awful. Nobody knew about it; there was a very low turnout. In 2008 which was the year we (MCAS) passed the bill, we got a little more exposure. Then we began doing stalking awareness rallies and speaking engagements and now the awareness has grown more. CB: After the first first fundraiser not going as planned, how did you remain encouraged? HW: You just keep moving. You have to keep doing it, because you know the awareness has to be out there.  CB: Why do you enjoy sharing your story? HW: I don’t know if I would say I enjoy it, I think I tell it out of necessity to save another person.  CB: Since founding MCAS, what’s your greatest memory or joy? HW: Having somebody actually hear the story and connecting with the story.  I also like when I get interviewed by a person and they look at you and they connect with you.  CB: What do you hope this Tee N tea would accomplish? HW: To bring awareness to stalking and to bring it to the forefront. [It’s all about] the effects stalking has and making people aware.        ...

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