Genuine Mother-Daughter Love
Feb09

Genuine Mother-Daughter Love

Written By Leah T. Johnson/ColorBlind Magazine  If there’s one thing Jessica Wright and Tasha Williams can agree on it’s that moms know best. Both young women have experienced firsthand the wisdom that their moms seem to naturally possess, and it is this quality among others that classifies their moms as their “Sheros” respectively. Mommie Memories Williams, 24, classifies her mom Susan Lary as being very artsy. “When I would young, my mom would let me sew little ornaments for Christmas,” Williams said as she described a snowman that she sewed to send as a gift to her family members. Her mom, who works as a teacher and plays piano also encouraged Williams to play piano and to participate in band as a young child. Wright, 29, is a mom herself to two sons; Cameron, 9, and Christian, 5. Her “motherly-techniques” to be nurturing came from her mom Catherine Broadnax, an administrative assistant for the Dean of Medicine at Wayne State University. “I remember on my 8th birthday I had no gifts because my mom’s job closed the same day. Still, she bought me a half and half necklace,” Wright said. “One half read ‘mother’ and the other half read ‘daughter,’” Wright said smiling widely. Currently, Wright and her mom have “diva days” and get their nails done and go to lunch. When the mommie-daughter duo aren’t together in person, they are chatting on the phone numerous times per day. “She’s my best friend and people say that’s not healthy,” said Wright. “But I can tell her anything, and we have silly conversations, but I ask her [about things] because she’s experienced.” Both Williams and Wright live separate from their moms, but Williams admits that she misses not being able to see her mom often. “I’ve lived apart from my mom for about two years, and my relationship with my mom was closer when I lived with her,” Williams said. “We would go out and shop, but now I don’t see her a lot, but we text often.” Mommie-Talk and “Girl Talk”  Open dialogue is something both Wright and Williams cherish having with their moms. They both believe that open, honest communication breed closeness. Both girls have seen their moms make tough choices, and sacrifices for the sake of their families, and for this they are truly grateful. “Moms know best, and they have your best interests at heart. It’s important to build that relationship with them, since that’s the first person you know!” said Williams. Wrights echoes Williams’ comments. “Listen to your mom and value her opinion because when you get older you are going to wish that you...

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Who Makes the First Move?
Feb08

Who Makes the First Move?

Written By Jade Gonzalez/ColorBlind Magazine  Recently, while at brunch with colleagues, we started talking about the last time we had been to this restaurant… well, our focus quickly shifted to a certain male worker that had caught my attention last time we had brunch. “Dang it, I wish he was here – I was so mad he left before I could give him my number.” “Oh, did he ask you for it last time then disappear?” “No, we just talked. But after I got the courage I was going to go give him my number.” “Wait… you’ll ask a guy out?” “Yeah… why not?” Trust me, I understand the “surprise factor” I get from other females when I share my stories of asking guys out. It’s not a common thing to see a woman put herself out there, open to getting publically denied. But actually, since I’ve been out in the “dating scene,” this act seems to be just as uncommon for males too. (I’d like to thank social media for that – NOTE: ADDING SOMEONE ON FACEBOOK IS NOT A CUTE GESTURE NOR ACCEPTABLE FLIRTING IN MY BOOK.) But the surprise factor my colleague gave me seemed to be a little more intense than other similar conversations I’ve had, which really peaked my interest. I have asked guys out a few times, but I wouldn’t call myself a “veteran” at it. Some questions I get from other females about this topic are usually, “How do you know they want to be asked out or even want your phone number?” Or my personal favorite, “What if he says no?” Well, let me say this ladies – these exact questions go through a male’s mind too and let’s just say my success rate has been pretty high. I just don’t agree that it’s only one sex’s job to initiate interest – if I think a guy is interesting that I’ve been in casual conversation with or if I think that ‘Joe Shmo’ over there is ridiculously handsome, why not give him my number? I guess you could call me “New School” when it comes to the dating world. My approach can be due to multiple things: I’m inpatient, a control freak at times, and my self-confidence has sky rocketed these past couple of life changing years. To make this post a little more interesting than just me arguing why I do what I do, I decided to ask various males about their personal stance on getting asked out by women. Lance Hay is all for woman taking a stronger stance when it comes to the dating world. “We live in...

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Bonding through Words with Maya Angelou
Feb08

Bonding through Words with Maya Angelou

This the Winter 2015 issue of ColorBlind Magazine is all about our “Shero’s”. Click the link below to read a post from Leah T. Johnson’s personal blog about her “Shero” Dr. Maya Angelou.  Bonding With Maya Angelou And here are encouraging words from Dr. Angelou herself when she appeared on Oprah’s Masterclass Just Do...

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Celebrating 50 Years of a Cultural Gem
Feb08

Celebrating 50 Years of a Cultural Gem

This personal interview with LaNesha DeBardelaben of the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, Michigan tells why 2015 is a BIG year for the museum. Interview Conducted By Leah T. Johnson/ColorBlind Magazine -What is your title and role at the museum?  As Vice President of Assessment & Community Engagement at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, I lead the museum’s accreditation process and engage the museum in community collaborations and initiatives.  I also oversee the museum’s Education department as well as its archives and research library. -In your opinion, what makes the museum a cultural gem in the city of Detroit?  The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History is a top cultural jewel in the City of Detroit.  At the center of the Wright Museum’s mission is education, a commitment to changing lives, and a desire to improve the quality of life for all we reach, through African American History and Culture.  The Wright Museum is more than just a museum.  It is a gathering spot, a source of inspiration, and the resting place of our ancestors.  The Wright Museum tells a story of triumph, of overcoming the odds, a story to which everyone can relate.  Truly, we show that African American history is American history. The vision of the Wright Museum is a world in which the adversity and achievement of African American history inspires everyone towards greater understanding, acceptance, and unity. -What special or annual events are being planned to celebrate the museum’s 50th anniversary?  We have a wide variety of programming to celebrate the museum’s 50th anniversary year.  On March 1, we will host an unforgettable musical performance called Oh Freedom.  It will feature legendary Grammy-awarded vocalist Patti Austin backed by a 75-voice Detroit choir.  This performance will celebrate 500 years of African American history through song.  It is a don’t-miss event. We have a wide variety of new children’s programming. We are extending our Camp Africa camp for children from two weeks to five weeks this year, including one week during the DPS spring break. We are calling that week the Spring Break Camp Africa.  We have a dynamic array of weekend family activities and weekday Kidz Time activities for young learners.  Links to Science and Meet the Scientists are Saturday programs for the family as well. During this spectacular 50th anniversary year, we will celebrate Ford Freedom in a new way this year. We’ll be engaging youth in hands-on technology this year as a part of Ford Freedom, and we are so grateful for the generous support of the Ford Foundation in making this possible. In July, we’ll...

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Good Read for Women: “Shifts”
Feb08

Good Read for Women: “Shifts”

Recently, the ColorBlind Magazine team has been sharing ideas of good books to read. Topics for the books include history, the workplace, womanhood, and the quarter life crisis. The book we are sharing with our readers this month is titled “Shifts- An Anthology of Women’s Growth through Change.” This book includes short stories, poems, and other writings from various women about the stages of womanhood. The book can be purchased...

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Poetry for a “Shero”
Feb08

Poetry for a “Shero”

The following is a free verse poem, about a “Shero” Written by Jade Gonzalez/ColorBlind Magazine   “Momma” When you look at me You see yourself And what you created I represent your past As well as your future Your strength Mental and physical Is superhuman Your love No different I can never say Those 3 words enough Because you taught me What they mean I am your world And you are mine...

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