My Blackstone Adventure-Calling all Entrepreneurs
May04

My Blackstone Adventure-Calling all Entrepreneurs

By Jessica L. Wilson/ColorBlind Magazine When entrepreneur is referenced, I’m always wondering on how young people, especially women, can accomplish this. And that’s when I remember Blackstone. Blackstone Launchpad is bringing young entrepreneurs into their own. The organization is centered on Wayne State students and other entrepreneurs within the community. It wants to help those seeking to become entrepreneurs socialize by meeting in local Detroit businesses once a month.  One of the best of these gatherings comes to mind: City Wings. I attended the meeting at City Wings, opened by Grant Lancaster, and it was the target spot for networking. The event was coordinated by the organization’s own Aubrey Agee II and Jason Beale. These events are free and the general public is encouraged to network as well. Food and drinks are provided for those who want to know more about being an entrepreneur. The best part of that event was when Lancaster spoke about the struggles of bringing City Wings into reality. Agee and Beale helped to make the guests feel comfortable by encouraging questions. Lancaster’s speech instilled much hope and determination within each attendee. This ties into my initial question: there were female students in attendance. It’s important to note this because women want and can become entrepreneurs ! There are plenty of resources available that can help girls and women get ahead, but with resources comes motivation and time. I can’t wait to update more Blackstone events. Maybe we’ll meet in a female-owned establishment in the near future… 🙂 Blackstone Launchpad events are announced before the beginning of each...

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May 2015 Editorial
May04

May 2015 Editorial

My mom is a self-proclaimed Fashionista. My response to her proclamation? #Truth. She can take an outfit and match it with just the right accessory (earrings, handbag, or shoes) with such ease and fluidity. But, my mom is more than just a woman who loves fashion, she’s a woman to be celebrated- as are all moms. Sadly, most people wait until that one faithful day in May to show their moms love by cards, balloons, brunch or other expensive gifts. But let’s not forget: your mom is your mom EVERY DAY. In this issue of ColorBlind Magazine, we reveal part two of the mother-daughter story that was inaugurated in the February 2015 issue. We also take a look at two moms who are entrepreneurs at heart- one in the health and beauty field, and the other in the culinary field. How are they passing on their respective passions to their kids and other women? You will also be introduced to a woman who lives in the present, but has refused to forget her past. To all of our readers who are new moms, moms at heart, mom’s by circumstance, and moms who have been “mommying” for so long ‘til your’re a pro, we see you, and we appreciate you.   Best, Leah T. Johnson ColorBlind Magazine CEO & Co-Founder...

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Mommy Dearest (Mother-Daughter love pt 2)
May04

Mommy Dearest (Mother-Daughter love pt 2)

By Leah T. Johnson/ColorBlind Magazine It’s been said that one of the hardest, yet rewarding job titles a woman can have is that of being a mom. The following article is part two of the “Mother Daughter story that first appeared in the February 2015 issue of ColorBlind Magazine. (Read part one here). Jessica Wright and Tasha Williams were featured in the first story. Read below to find out what their moms had to say about their daughters and motherhood. ColorBlind Magazine: What do you enjoy most about being a mom? Catherine Broadnax (Mother of Jessica Wright): It’s the family and closeness that I feel. It’s my most rewarding accomplishment is being a mom. I love my grandkids and that’s what I enjoy about it. Susan Lary (Mother of Tasha Williams): The  joys of being a mom are in that I had the opportunity to see the miracle of life enfold first hand.  The whole pregnancy is such a time of wonder..what will my baby look like, is it a boy or girl, will the baby be healthy, tall, shy, outgoing…etc….and knowing that somehow a part of myself is being passed along to another generation- which had been passed on to me by my parents and so on….just being a part of the life cycle and the miracle of life itself brings joy. Then watching my daughter develop. Every little move was fascinating at first. And then the milestones such as smiling, first tooth, turning over, crawling, walking, first words…..it all brought joy. As my daughter grew older I began to remember back to my own childhood, teenage days, and finally adult younger years which my daughter is experiencing now. Witnessing the successes in school, making friends, playing music, graduating from college, getting a job, moving out and establishing her own home, having a serious relationship with her boyfriend are all things that brought me joy. Being able to nurture, provide, feel needed and loved all brought me joy. ColorBlind Magazine: What’s most challenging about being a mom? Mrs. Broadnax: Being able to let go because I didn’t want her to make the same mistakes [I had made]. For me, I wasn’t close to her mom- I was given away and adopted. I always felt that there was something missing and there was a disconnect. And that’s why I held on with Jessica. Mrs. Lary: Some of the challenges were/are anytime my daughter hurts it’s hard not to feel the hurt along with her (and sometimes all over again if it is something I experienced myself).  Another challenge- wanting my daughter to avoid making mistakes I made- even though...

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Beauty’s Only Skin Deep
May04

Beauty’s Only Skin Deep

By Leah T. Johnson/ ColorBlind Magazine  Regina Whittler believes that three words can set the tone for each day: I am beautiful. Her love for beauty, particularly inner beauty is a large reason why Whittler became a Mary Kay consultant after being a faithful user of the product herself for over 25 years. “This position offers me financial stability, freedom of time, and the opportunity to enrich other women’s lives.” Mary Kay’s mantra “God first, family, then business,” resonates strongly with Whittler as she believes this mantra is a mindset of all consultants, allowing them to change the lives of many women. THE UGLY SIDE OF BEAUTY Whittler is fully aware that the beauty industry is cutthroat, and has made numerous girls and women feel less than beautiful. Pictures of the “perfect” looking woman cover ads and magazines, which in turn makes girls strive for an elusive, imaginary standard of beauty. This is why saying and hearing the words “I am Beautiful” is so important. “I think some young ladies don’t hear it enough from their dad or their mom,” said Whittler. Some young girls want to be validated through boys.” Whittler’s hope is that through Mary Kay she will personally be able to reach out to women and let them know just how beautiful they are. She testifies to the fact that Mary Kay has made women who were once introverts become extroverts. “God made you beautiful just the way you are,” she said. “You gotta love yourself first.” If you are interested in having Regina host a beauty party for you and some of your girls or to learn more about Mary Kay products, contact her at rwhittler1@marykay.com or visit www.marykay.com/rwhittler1...

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Salsa Fiesta in the Kitchen
May04

Salsa Fiesta in the Kitchen

By Leah T. Johnson/ColorBlind Magazine Some things are too good to be kept as a family tradition only, they must be shared with others. Sonia Lopez, a mother and cooking Queen, strongly believes that her salsa represents more than just three generations of a family recipe; it represents love. “Of course I love when I’m making salsa because it’s my creative outlet, but when I see the faces of people enjoying the food [salsa] that I make, that to me is just most rewarding,” Lopez said with a big smile. The chopping and mixing of tomatoes, onions, and other special ingredients began for Lopez when she was a young teenager. At the time, she felt that her mom was punishing her for bringing her in the kitchen to make salsa. “I didn’t like cooking back then, I thought it was a chore. But now I love it!” She has started teaching her daughter how to prepare salsa, with the hope that she will enjoy cooking as she grows up. “Mujer de Negocios” Business Woman After her birth in California, and a year spent in San Ignacio a small town in Mexico, Lopez’s family moved to Detroit. Her familiarity with closeness, family, and sharing freely, could have contributed to her uncertainty she experienced prior to deciding to profit from her salsa. “I would bring samples as a sign of love for my co workers,” Lopez said. “I thought about it [selling the salsa] but never had the courage to do it. You’re your own worst critic.” It wasn’t until she received an encouraging word from a co-worker that she decided to create Sonia’s Salsa- her first enterprising business- in Mid-December 2014. She has even decided to sell her salsa at local bars, and makes it for special occasions such as the Super Bowl when people especially crave some form of chips and dip. As the seasons change, Lopez makes different flavors of salsa, one of which is Salsa Verde- a salsa made from a green tomato and gives leaves a tangy taste on the palate. Her goal is to expand not only her salsa flavors, but to expand her business by opening a food truck. “Opening a food truck will allow me to be mobile and share other flavorful Mexican dishes with people,  the salsa will be the delicious appetizer,” she said. After receiving successful and steady sales since the birth of her business, Lopez is enjoying the emotional happiness that accompanies entrepreneurship. “This shows us that we as women can be independent. Do you know how much self esteem it has given me and to my daughter? It gives...

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Educating the Present About the Past
May04

Educating the Present About the Past

-By Leah Johnson/ColorBlind Magazine It’s often said that one cannot know where they are going unless they know where they came from. Charday Ward, a Detroit native, took it upon herself to make sure that today’s generation is well informed about their history. This led her to found her organization Project-History.org. Here is her story… ColorBlind Magazine: How/Why did you start this project?  Charday Ward: I started project history because I realized that black children know very For three years I’ve taught a black history course , which I proposed and designed the curriculum for, at the high school in Detroit where I also teach English and writing. Each year I’ve had the opportunity to teach a new group of eleventh graders and I’ve been astounded at their lack of knowledge. The majority of eleventh graders knew nothing of Africa or ancient African kingdoms, and very little about the African diaspora and  African American legacy in this country. This class is where I feel I’ve had the greatest impact on students’ lives. I not only provided them with knowledge , but also with self -pride and self-determination. I watched their eyes light up when they learned that the African king, Mansa Musa, was the richest man to ever live. They were filled with pride in themselves when they read that Frederick Douglass, determined to never be beaten again, stood up to his master and won the fight! I witnessed their lives change over the course of a semester; they had become conscious of themselves because they were conscious of their history. I was determined to provide this experience not only to students in my school but to Black students in communities around the country . From that determination, Project History was born. CB: Why is Black History Important to you? CW: Black history is important to me because it is my history. It’s like amirror that I can look into to see my own reflection and understand the people and legacy from which I come from. It is important to me to advocate for Black history because I believe it can have the same purpose and effect in the lives of countless other Black people. CB: In what way(s) do you think African Americans have forgotten our history? CW: I don’t believe that collectively we have ever truly known our history. It has not been kept securely by the elders, or passed down to new generations. West African communities have traditionally had griots, storytellers whose only purpose in their communities is to keep, and pass down history. They instill a sense of pride into the children by informing them of their past. Black communities in America have not made this protection and preservation of our history a priority. CB: What goals do you have for this...

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