#1YearFacebookFree
Aug03

#1YearFacebookFree

By Jade Gonzalez/ColorBlind Magazine Facebook has many different functions; allows you to stay in touch with people all over the world, keeps you up to date on the latest celebrity gossip, keeps you in the know of your follower’s current political stance and opinions, and let’s not forget the viral videos that make us all laugh or even cringe. So it would be hard to not have this multi-outlet website, right? Well, one year ago I decided to ditch “The Book,” and although at times I ran into roadblocks, getting rid of my Facebook page was one of the greatest and healthiest decisions I had ever made for myself. I will be the first to admit that I had suffered from FOMO.  I wasn’t one that could go on Facebook strictly to just ‘stay in contact.’ I would find myself browsing my feed, almost zombie-like, comparing my life to my 1,000+ “friends.” “Wow, she’s already on baby #3? I wonder if I’ll even have children.” “Awe, they got engaged! They always seemed like such the perfect couple.” “Ugh, my ex bought a new car… I wish I could buy a new car…” The thoughts were never ending and always had one common denominator, I left my Facebook app feeling insecure about everything from my body to my relationships. Recently I came across a quote that describes this Facebook comparison epidemic perfectly: “One reason we struggle with insecurity: we’re comparing our behind the scenes to everyone else’s highlight reel.” – Steven Furtick When I first got rid of Facebook, it was difficult. I was no longer receiving event invites to different parties, I was forgetting peoples birthdays because I no longer had a constant reminder in the top right corner of my computer screen (is this even where birthday reminders are anymore?), and I didn’t know about the hilarious videos and memes that were talked about when I would gather with my friends. But with time, this all stopped bothering me and I felt something that I hadn’t in a long time – pure happiness. I was no longer comparing every aspect of my life to the classmate I hadn’t seen in 7 years with 3 kids, a beautiful home, and handsome husband. I was living life for ME again and not for my Facebook friends. I even found numerous people online, writing blogs on being Facebook free and it really helped me with the transition. I would look at these blogs for guidance on how to handle the ups and downs of not being in the social media eye anymore. And to all those people who made posts, I...

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The Love Style of Teaching
Aug03

The Love Style of Teaching

By Leah T. Johnson/ColorBlind Magazine “Life begins promptly at 8:01 am, if not 7:59 am,” said College Readiness teacher Pamela Love. Once the school day begins (Love’s day starts at about 4 am), she knows that she will have to wear a variety of hats: mother, father, counselor, social worker, and oh yeah, Teacher. Faithfully, and patiently, she fulfills her job responsibilities, spurred on by the love for and the love from her college-bound students. Lost (and Found) Teacher When considering all the heart and soul that Love puts into her teaching, it wouldn’t be farfetched to think she always planned to become a teacher. Love planned to go to Law School until she received a call from a friend. “She told me I have that ‘something’ that teachers have or don’t have.” That was over 20 years ago, and Love hasn’t looked back since.  “Most go into it [teaching] by happens-chance,” said Love. “Young people choose it and find it’s not their passion. It wasn’t in my plan, but you have to have a passion for it…you have to have a love for students and patience.” That experience led Love to teach English and Language Arts to middle schoolers at Detroit Edison Public School Academy Early College of Excellence until she was asked to teach College Readiness to 10th-12th graders, 98% of whom were once her middle school students. “To see them evolve into these young, brilliant minds that are getting ready to face some of the greatest times of their lives which is their college experience, it just put me in an awesome space,” Love said. College Prep “Cultivating and preparing minds to go to college was a big deal to me and I took it very seriously,” said Love. I scared the students at first, but once they found out it was for their benefit, it was effortless to me.” The serious side of Love’s teaching style stems from the fact that even in 2015 we are faced with many young ones being the first in their family to attend college. This fact impressed upon Love the need to incorporate topics such as filling out a college application, FAFSA, dealing with students from other countries, tenured professors, class schedules, money management, date rape, parties and other topics. “These are topics that parents could be afraid to talk about, but we had real conversations.” The talks and lessons were so real that Love planned a mock “Day in the Life of a College Student” activity. Under her leadership, attendance in this class has improved greatly,allowing Love to tailor her lessons further to her student’s personalities, especially those...

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Educating the Masses One Tribe at a Time
Aug03

Educating the Masses One Tribe at a Time

By Veronica Grandison/ColorBlind Magazine Jerrice Donelson, (third from the right) When high school students are in their final two years of school, the main things on their minds are usually finding the right college to attend, searching for prom outfits (and dates), and striving to do well on standardized tests like the ACT. However, working to improve their writing skills so that they can handle the challenges of college work is one task that is often neglected. But, Jerrice Donelson is working to change that mindset through her nonprofit organization Scribe Tribe Writing Tutors. Scribe Tribe is a community-based, non-profit outreach initiative that offers academic support to Detroit area high school students through providing tutoring services in writing to prepare the students for college. Scribe Tribe also teaches the students reading comprehension strategies because Donelson emphasized that reading comprehension is really essential to being able to know how to write. Donelson created the organization in response to the need for writing workshops for Detroit based students who were not receiving the additional academic support for the subject in school. “A lot of our high school students are not able to articulate their ideas and bring their writing to a solid level and get their ideas to be cohesive. A lot of times it’s because they are not comprehending the reading and deconstructing it in a way that they can digest it and understand it,” says Donelson. This program prepares students for college level writing by providing an environment where they feel like they are in a college classroom setting and they learn how to write in different disciplines such as anthropology, biology, and other behavioral science classes that are often general requirements in college. Writing is truly a passion for Donelson, who holds a bachelor’s degree in English with a certificate in Writing Composition from the University of Michigan-Dearborn. She is currently working on her Master’s degree in Teaching in English and a minor in English as a Second Language. Donelson first got the idea for Scribe Tribe as an undergraduate student at UM-Dearborn while working with high school students through academic outreach programs such as Gear Up and Dual Enrollment. Donelson holds a bachelor’s degree in English and a certificate in Composition from the University of Michigan-Dearborn. She is currently working on her Masters in Teaching in English and a minor in English as a Second Language. While at UM-Dearborn she has worked with academic outreach programs such as Gear Up and Dual Enrollment. She realized that the dual enrollment students were submerged in college courses while they were still high school students, but they had no college...

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August Issue Editorial
Aug03

August Issue Editorial

She was anxious from the moment she walked into the workshop room. She came to update her resume and she later revealed to me (I’m a Work Readiness workshop facilitator) that she has been out of work recently, and although she is receiving unemployment she feels jittery just being at home. Because of this, she has not felt like doing “girly things” such as hair and makeup, and has even toyed with the idea of suicide. Tears started to well up in her eyes, and it was at that moment I knew two things: I needed to go and grab her some tissue-FAST More importantly, this resume workshop had become more than just a class that I was teaching; I had to console her. The August issue of ColorBlind Magazine is about Education and honoring those who perform the daily task of teaching. As you read this issue, please remember: Teaching is more than just imparting knowledge; most times it means imparting your very heart and soul to people. Teaching is considered a human service, especially considering the work of Jerrice Donelson, a grad student at U of M- Dearborn and creator of an after-school nonprofit writing organization known as The Scribe Tribe. Donelson and her “tribe” highly esteem the importance of good writing. Our other teacher Pamela Love, shares her love (no pun intended) with college-bound students as she challenges them in her College Readiness course at Detroit Edison Public School Academy- Early College of Excellence. Other stories in this issue allow you to educate yourself on topics that are on the minds of teens, and how one of our editors made the decision to take a 1 year hiatus from Facebook and has not regretted her decision. Returning to the woman who had her emotionally charged moment…It was only myself and one other person who frequents my workshops in the room that day which helped provide a friendly atmosphere. She left with a resume that was on point. But more importantly, she felt stronger emotionally. I may have taught her how to create a resume, but I also taught her that she must love herself FIRST and that is more important than anything she could have written on her resume. To all of our dear teachers, in whatever capacity it is that you teach: Thank YOU for teaching us what teaching is TRULY about. Happy Reading, Leah T. Johnson...

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