2016 Essence Black Women In Hollywood Luncheon
Feb29

2016 Essence Black Women In Hollywood Luncheon

“When black women are together a sacred space is conjured.” — Ava DuVernay (Film maker/Director). Those were the opening words that Oprah Winfrey quoted to start the 2016 Essence Black Women in Hollywood Luncheon. For the second year, OWN has televised this intimate event, to give women, particularly women of color, an opportunity to celebrate with those who have broken barriers in Hollywood. The winners/honorees were as follows: Fierce and Fearless Award— Tracee Ellis Ross. Her father was in the audience, and Tracee spoke about being afraid at times because she felt she didn’t have a voice. However, her body of work is quite impressive. “I feel like a rockstar at being human!” she shouted as she ended her acceptance speech. Power Award— Nina Shaw. She was recognized for being an attorney. “I stood up for you, but I was able to do so because you stood with me.” The award was presented to her by Nick Cannon (of whom Shaw was his attorney) and Channing Dungey (new President of ABC). Shaw encouraged the audience by saying “If you are a woman who wants to be empowered then empower other women.” Legend Award—Debbie Allen. This award was presented to her by Shondaland’s very own  Shonda Rhimes. Allen gave a powerful speech, that ended full circle with her saying “This is a moment in the sun, and a moment can be a...

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Chained in Silence: Praise for Dr. Talitha LeFlouria’s Book
Feb05

Chained in Silence: Praise for Dr. Talitha LeFlouria’s Book

Written By Leah T. Johnson/ColorBlind Magazine  Dr. Talitha LeFlouria dared to tell difficult stories- and she succeeded. Inspired by the memories of her great-grandmother Leola Johnson, who was born and raised in Jim Crow Georgia and grew up less than five miles from the worst chain gang in the state, and the work of the Historical essay “The Convict Lease System” by Ida B. Wells,  is Dr. LeFlouria’s book “Chained in Silence: Black Women and Convict Labor in the New South.” “I wanted to excavate the memories she [grandma Leola] dared to forget, while at the same time, giving voice to the women in this study who were still waiting to be heard,” LeFlouria said. The book, which was a 12 year process that began as part of LeFlouria’s dissertation project at Howard University, is written from a personal perspective, infused with passion and determination, making it relatable to various audiences, especially to those interested in  African American and African American Women’s History. LeFlouria describes this book as a “labor of love” after spending an immeasurable amount of time in the archives trying to make sense of what she read and then reconstructing the data. “I felt anxious about how people would think of my retelling of these women’s stories…Nevertheless, I’m so glad I told it all,” she said. LeFlouria also wore the hat of a detective, as she often would begin tracking a woman, but the trail became unclear at times and it wouldn’t be until years later that the rest of the woman’s story would be uncovered. However, Dr. LeFlouria remained persistent; convinced that these stories must be told as this was an untouched topic in the large chapter of African American History. She credits the production of this book to something bigger than herself. “To write this kind of story, you have to possesses a great courage, a courage that comes from above and not from within.” she said. Dr. Talitha LeFlouria says “The Convict Lease System” essay by Wells transformed her understanding of black women. She was impressed with Wells’ fearlessness and relentlessness to tell the truth. In December 2015, Dr. LeFlouria received the 1st Ida B. Wells Tribute Award from the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History for her work and research on the book. “Receiving an award named after Wells is beyond humbling, I could not be more grateful.” Click here to purchase “Chained in Silence: Black Women and Convict Labor in the New South.” Use code: 0120DIS at checkout for a 20% off discount!  Dr. Talitha L. LeFlouria is an associate professor of history at Florida Atlantic University and a postdoctoral fellow at the Carter...

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TBT: ThrowBack Trends Hair Edition
Feb05

TBT: ThrowBack Trends Hair Edition

Written By: Genell Wright Contributing Beauty Writer/ColorBlind Magazine  Genell loves everything about hair. She is known to encourage anyone to try a style they normally wouldn’t, and she sets the tone as she frequently changes her hairstyle too. Yes, her hair is always “whipped and Nae Nae’d”. Here’s her First article with CB Mag and she shares her thoughts on a classic Hairstyle …  We’re taking it back old school! Do you remember the classic yet sassy hairstyle: twisties with a ponytail (weave or natural)? If you do remember it, no doubt you were among the many young girls (and women) who rocked it like it was the best thing since sliced bread. To achieve this style, you had to start with freshly shampooed and pressed hair. Dirty and poofy hair were a BAD combination. This style wouldn’t be complete without Beeswax (for those edges) and “Pump It Up” Spritz (for maximum hold).  This hairstyle consisted of 3-5 twisties (flat twists that started with a swoop) across the front or back of your head; going up into a sleek, curly or wavy weave (or natural) ponytail. There were many variations to this trendy hairstyle. In fact, as a hairstylist, I NEVER wanted to look like everyone else, so I would add my little “twists” (no pun intended) to the hairstyle.  Sometimes, I’d have cornrows going through or over the twisties. I remember doing 3-D twisties that would stand up. OK?! Talk about styling and profiling! However, when this style was worn, you were “It” and you knew it. Although hairstyles have shifted into the crochet braids, naturalista, lace front wig, u-part wig and pronto weave phases; we can’t forget to show love to our TBT-Twisties with a Ponytail! What were some of your memories of this throwback hairstyle? Share them with us on Instagram @ColorblindMag Until next time… Keep it Cute!...

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Love & Marriage: Zenia Turner
Feb05

Love & Marriage: Zenia Turner

More from ColorBlind Magazine Reader and Bride-to-Be Zenia Turner… ColorBlind Magazine: How would you describe your wedding theme? Zenia Turner: Our wedding theme is so corny (thanks to me), but I love it! A lot of my inspiration for color and decorating has been Fruity Floral. My colors are going to be purple and red; rich colors for the fall since our wedding will take place during the first weekend of Autumn (the season we met). I’m currently expecting between 120 – 150 individuals, and the vibe is going to be classic traditions with a modern palette. CB: When it comes to being a wife, what are you most looking forward to? ZT: The thing that I’m looking most forward to in being a wife is solidifying and strengthening what has proven to be one of the most prosperous relationships of my life. Also, knowing I have someone by my side that will encourage my growth as an individual and whom I can share that with. That may seem very broad or cliché to say, but it’s the truth. We have been through A LOT (good and some not so good) in our 8 years as a couple. I remember people would constantly ask us when we planned to marry. I can’t lie; sometimes it did bother me not being considered an “honest” woman by others. However, I knew we weren’t ready and he knew it too. We had to let each other grow up and figure out who we were as individuals. At this point in our lives, we’re confident that our understanding of the sacrifices, duties, and commitment which comes along with the glory of marriage is something we can engage in together for the growth of our bond as well as for the growth of each individual self. CB: Any Bridal Advice?  ZT: I would suggest that all brides planning their own wedding keep a binder full of their inspirational photos as well as their contracts and a spreadsheet of booking deposits and payments made. Weddingwire.com has an awesome checklist with suspense dates to make sure I stay on top of everything. Also, luckily, my sister/best friend of about 18 years is my Matron of Honor, and she has also been such a big help in planning and keeping me calm. She also is married so she gives me a lot of future insight into what I may expect throughout this journey and after getting...

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